Thursday, March 22, 2012

Portrait Photo To Color Sketch In Photoshop


Portrait Photo To Color Sketch In Photoshop

Learn Photoshop with Photo Effects Tutorials at Photoshop Essentials.com

Written by Steve Patterson
In this Photo Effects tutorial, we'll learn how to easily convert a portrait photo into a pencil sketch with Photoshop. The initial sketch will appear in black and white, but at the end of the tutorial, we'll learn how to colorize it with the photo's original colors! In the next tutorial, we'll learn a slightly different way to convert an image into a sketch, one that's usually better suited for objects or landscape photos.
I'll be using Photoshop CS5 throughout this tutorial but the steps apply to any recent version of Photoshop. If you're using Photoshop Elements 8 or 9, you'll find that version of the tutorial here.
Here's the photo I'll be starting with:
The original photo. Image licensed from shutterstock by Photoshop Essentials.com.
The original portrait image.
Here's how it will look when we're done:
Photoshop photo to color pencil sketch effect. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The final portrait to sketch result.


Let's get started!
View the Photoshop Elements version of this tutorial.

Step 1: Duplicate The Background Layer

The first thing we should do before starting on the effect is make a copy of the original image so we don't harm it in case we need it later. With the photo newly opened in Photoshop, we see in the Layers panel that the image is sitting on the Background layer:
The Background layer in Photoshop. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The Layers panel showing the photo on the Background layer.
Go up to the Layer menu in the Menu Bar along the top of the screen, choose New, then choose Layer via Copy. Or, for a faster way to run the same command, press Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac) on your keyboard:
The New Layer via Copy command in Photoshop. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Layer > New > Layer via Copy, or press Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac).
Either way tells Photoshop to make a copy of the layer, which it names "Layer 1", and place it above the Background layer. Notice that Layer 1 is highlighted in blue, which tells us it's the active layer. Anything we do next will happen to the copy of the image on Layer 1, leaving the original on the Background layer unharmed:
Photoshop Layers panel. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
A copy of the photo appears on Layer 1.

Step 2: Desaturate The Image

Go up to the Image menu at the top of the screen, choose Adjustments, then choose Desaturate:
Photoshop Desaturate image command. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Image > Adjustments > Desaturate.
The Desaturate command instantly removes all color from the image, giving us a quick black and white version:
A desaturated image in Photoshop. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The Desaturate command isn't the best way to convert an image to black and white, but it's good enough for our purposes here.

Step 3: Duplicate The Layer

Next, we need to make a copy of our desaturated image. Go back up to the Layer menu, choose New, then choose Layer via Copy, or press Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac) on your keyboard, just as we did in Step 1. Photoshop makes a copy of Layer 1, names it "Layer 1 copy", and places it directly above Layer 1 in the Layers panel:
A copy of Layer 1 appears in the Layers panel. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Photoshop always places copies of a layer above the original.

Step 4: Invert The Image

Go back up to the Image menu at the top of the screen, choose Adjustments, then choose Invert:
Photoshop Invert image command. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Image > Adjustments > Invert.
This inverts the colors in the image, or in our case the brightness values, making light areas dark and dark areas light, leaving us with a photo negative effect:
An inverted image in Photoshop. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The image after inverting the brightness values.

Step 5: Change The Blend Mode To Color Dodge

At the top of the Layers panel, you'll find the Blend Mode option. It doesn't actually say "Blend Mode" anywhere but it's the drop-down box that's set to Normal by default. Click on the word Normal, which opens a list of layer blend modes, and choose Color Dodge from the list:
The Color Dodge layer blend mode in Photoshop. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Change the blend mode of the inverted layer from Normal to Color Dodge.
The document will temporarily appear filled with white. Depending on your image, there may be some areas of black here and there, but for the most part it will be filled with white:
The image after changing the layer blend mode to Color Dodge. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
After changing the blend mode to Color Dodge, the document appears white.

Step 6: Apply The Gaussian Blur Filter

This next step is where we actually create the sketch effect. Go up to the Filter menu at the top of the screen, choose Blur, then choose Gaussian Blur:
Selecting the Gaussian Blur filter in Photoshop. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.
This opens the Gaussian Blur filter's dialog box. We create the sketch effect by blurring the layer. Begin dragging the Radius slider at the bottom of the dialog box towards the right to apply a slight amount of blurring. As you drag, you'll see the sketch effect appearing in the document. The further you drag the slider, the more blurring will be applied and the more intense the sketch effect will become. If you drag the slider too far, though, too much of the original photo will show through and it won't look like a sketch anymore.
There's no specific Radius value to enter since the amount of blurring you use will depend on what you think looks good for your image, so make sure you keep an eye on your document to judge the results as you drag the slider. For my image, I'll set my Radius value to around 12 pixels or so:
Photoshop Gaussian Blur filter. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Drag the Radius slider to increase or decrease the amount of blurring.
Here's what my initial sketch effect looks like:
Photoshop photo to pencil sketch effect. Image © 2011 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The initial black and white sketch.
Next, we'll learn how to darken the lines in the sketch and how to colorize it!

diambila dari  sini.




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